THE MENACE OF FULANI HERDSMEN IN NIGERIA AND THE WAY FORWARD

Total pages: 15pages

Chapters: 6chapters

PREFACE

This study analyzed the menace of the Fulani herdsmen in Nigeria and the way forward. For a few years, there has been a raging battle between Fulani herdsmen and farmers of Nigeria’s middle states of Benue, Jos and Taraba. This conflict if left to mutate can discourage tourists from visiting the different amazing destinations situated in this region.

Chapter one introduces the topic and gives an insight of who the Fulani herdsmen are.

Chapter two gives a brief history of the Fulani herdsmen, how the came about, their herding system and movement.

Chapter three talks on the effect and implications of the Fulani herdsmen and Benue Farmers conflict.

Chapter four makes us understand the Fulani herdsmen crisis in Nigeria, who they are, why they are violent, some recent attacks by them, and the grazing routes plan by the Nigerian government.

Chapter five analyzed the way forward towards this Fulani herdsmen crisis in Nigeria.

Chapter six concludes the study of the menace of the Fulani herdsmen in Nigeria,

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER ONE

1.1 INTRODUCTION

1.2 WHO ARE THE FULANI HERDSMEN?

CHAPTER TWO:

2.1 BRIEF HISTORY OF FULANI HERDSMEN

2.1.1 HERDING SYSTEM

2.1.2 MOVEMENT

CHAPTER THREE:

3.1 THE EFFECT AND IMPLICATIONS OF THE FULANI HERDSMEN AND BENUE FARMER CONFLICT

CHAPTER FOUR:

4.1 UNDERSTANDING THE FULANI HERDSMEN CRISIS IN NIGERIA

4.1.1 WHO ARE THE FULANI HERDSMEN?

4.1.2 WHY ARE THEY VIOLENT?

4.1.3 RECENT ATTACKS BY THE FULANI HERDSMEN

4.1.4 ARE BOKO HARAM MEMBERS MISTAKEN FOR THE FULANI HERDSMEN?

4.1.5 RESPONSES FROM VARIOUS STAKEHOLDERS

4.1.6 THE GRAZING ROUTES’ PLAN BY THE NIGERIAN GOVERNMENTS

4.1.7 WHAT TO EXPECT

CHAPTER FIVE:

5.1 FULANI HERDSMEN MENACE: THE WAY FORWARD

CHAPTER SIX:

6.1 CONCLUSION

REFERENCES

CHAPTER ONE

1.1 Introduction

Conflicts between farmers and nomadic cattle herders have been a common feature of economic livelihood in West Africa (Tonah, 2006). In the period before the beginning of the 20th century, the problem was mainly restricted to the savanna belts of West Africa. Cattle rearing were mainly prevalent in the Guinea, Sudan and Sahel savanna belts where crop production was carried out only during the short rainy season on a small scale. This gave the cattle herders access to a vast area of grass land. As time went on, and with the introduction of irrigated farming in the Savanna belt of Nigeria, and the increased withering of pasture during the dry season, less pasture was available to cattle herders. The herdsmen had to move southward to the coastal zone where the rainy season is longer and the soil retains moisture for long, in search of pasture and water–a movement called transhumance (Blench, 1994). This gave rise to an increased pressure on natural resources and a stiff competition for available resources between farmers and herders (Adebayo, 1997).

Conflict in resource use is not uncommon and perhaps not unnatural in human ecosystems. Moore (2005) noted that conflict per se, is not bad: it is perhaps a necessity in the evolution and development of human organizations. But when conflicts degenerate to violent, destructive clashes, they become not only unhealthy but also counter-productive and progress-threatening. Nyong and Fiki (2005) pointed out that resource-related conflicts were responsible for over 12 percent decline in per capita food production in sub-Saharan Africa. Competition-driven conflicts between arable crop farmers and cattle herdsmen have thus become common occurrence in many parts of Nigeria. De Haan (2002) observed that no less than twenty villages were involved in farmer-herdsmen conflicts annually in the state covered by his study.

Click here to get full article…

How useful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating / 5. Vote count:

0Shares

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Copyright © All rights reserved. | Oracus ng by teamoracus.