UNITED NATION AND CHALLENGES OF PROMOTING GENDER EQUALITY ACROSS CULTURE

Total pages: 10pages

Chapters: 3chapters

PREFACE

Chapter one introduces the topic.

Chapter two explains Gender equality and Gender biases.

Chapter three talked about the challenges in Gender equality; violence against women, forced marriage, bride price, female genital mutilation. It also talked about the way forward.

Chapter four gives the conclusion of the topic.

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER ONE: 

1.1 INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER TWO:

2.1 WHAT IS GENDER EQUALITY?

2.2 GENDER BIASES

3.1 CHALLENGES IN GENDER EQUALITY

3.1.1 VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN

3.1.2 FORCED MARRIAGE

3.1.3 BRIDE PRICES

3.1.4 FEMALE GENITAL MUTILATION

3.2 THE WAY FORWARD

CONCLUSION

REFERENCES

CHAPTER ONE

1.1 Introduction

Women are the key to the development challenge. Throughout the developing world, women are at a disadvantage at the household, community, and societal levels. Within the household, women have less access to and control over resources and limited influence over household decisions. Beyond the household, women have limited access to communal resources, are under-represented in public decision-making bodies; have limited bargaining power in markets (such as the labor market), and often lack opportunities to improve their socioeconomic position. Therefore, efforts to reduce gender inequality are required on multiple fronts.

Over the last several decades a number of strategies have emerged and evolved to promote gender equity in development efforts. Yet debates regarding the relative efficacy of these strategies remain. On Thursday, April 26, 2007, the Woodrow Wilson Center convened a group of experts on gender and development to address the issue of gender inequality from a variety of perspectives. Panelists reflected on past efforts to promote gender equity and discussed effective strategies for the way forward.

The first panel discussed the main approaches to promoting gender equity and the progress made towards incorporating gender concerns in development institutions. Laying out the historical context in which the Women in Development (WID) and Gender and Development (GAD) strategies emerged, Jane Jaquette argued that the way in which these approaches evolved has depended very much on the limitations and opportunities available at different points in time. Moreover, in practice, the projects and programs initiated under both strategies were not so different, as both faced many of the same constraints. Jaquette stressed that placing these approaches in their historical context makes it possible to transcend the debates between WID and GAD proponents, enabling development practitioners to devise creative ways to promote gender equity, and get ahead of rather than simply responding to current trends.

 

Click here to get full article

How useful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating / 5. Vote count:

0Shares

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Copyright © All rights reserved. | Oracus ng by teamoracus.